Clinical Information For the Treatment Of Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)

What Is Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)?

whatisacidrefluxdisease(gerd)?

Acid Reflux Disease (GERD) - Basics

Acid Reflux Disease, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (a valve-like muscle between the stomach and the esophagus) spontaneously opens or doesn't properly close, allowing digestive acids from the stomach to rise into the esophagus along with other stomach contents. The most common symptom of Acid Reflux Disease in adults in heartburn, or acid indigestion.

Below you will find alternative and natural treatment options including those from a Chinese Medicine perspective for Acid Reflux Disease.

What Patterns Are Related To Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)?

whatpatternsarerelatedtoacidrefluxdisease(gerd)?

Acid Reflux Disease (GERD) - Diagnostic Patterns

The Chinese Medicine treatment of acid reflux disease (gerd) generally involves arriving at the appropriate TCM diagnosis or pattern. This pattern within the individual is what treatment is based on not the general condition (see treating the cause and not the symptoms).

The following patterns may represent the underlying contributing factors for the development of acid reflux disease (gerd):

Liver Attacking the SpleenStomach ColdStomach DampnessStomach Fire

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Which Tam Healing and Tongren Therapy Protocols Apply To Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)?

whichtamhealingandtongrentherapyprotocolsapplytoacidrefluxdisease(gerd)?

Acid Reflux Disease (GERD) - Tam Healing and Tongren Therapy Protocols

Tong Ren Therapy is the energy healing/medical qi gong aspect of the Tam Healing System. The areas of focus for acid reflux disease (gerd) that we would use in Tong Ren techniques form the basis for our acupuncture treatments as well. Generally you would mix these primary points with points specific to the patients underlying TCM pattern and then our tuina (medical massage) would be largely focused on these points as well.

The following Tam healing and tong ren therapy protocols may be used with acid reflux disease (gerd):

16 Points Are Empirically Important For Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)

1 TCM Herb Are Potentially Used With Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)

Formulas and Products @ Our Store Associated With Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)

The Following (11)Formulas TCM Herbal Formulas May Be Useful For Acid Reflux Disease (GERD)

Ban Xia Xie Xin Wan (Pinellia Drain Epigastrium Pills)

Clinical Usages

  • Distension and fullness of the epigastrium usually without pain.
  • Borborygmus (gurgling sounds), and diarrhea if spleen qi is affected.
  • Vomiting with possible dry heaves due to rebellious stomach qi.

    Clinical Categorization

    Cautions

      Do not use for epigastric distention due to food stagnation.  Use with caution if patient has yin deficiency.

        Bao He Wan (Preserve Harmony Pills)

        Clinical Usages

        • Epigastric and or abdominal fullness or painful distention after meals.
        • Acid reflux, belching, vomiting with possible aversion to food due to food stagnation.
        • This formula can also be used for acute food poisoning.

          Clinical Categorization

          Cautions

            Use with caution with weak or qi deficient patients.

              Chen Xiang Hua Qi Wan (Aquilaria Qi Transforming Pills)

              Clinical Usages

              For spleen qi deficiency with damp heat accumulation in the lower.  The spleen system is effectively the western version of the digestive system.  The spleen is responsible for extracting the energy from the food and properly breaking the food down.  When the spleen is weak the overall energy tends to drop, the appetite may be poor, and the mood may also be on the down side.  Furthermore, the weakness of the spleen results in the accumulation of byproducts (damp) which tend to accumulate in the lower.

              Symptoms may include diarrhea, constipation, excessive gas, and abdominal distension.  This formula is used to treat belching, acid reflux, poor appetite, abdominal distension, flatulence, constipation, and abdominal cramping and discomfort.

              Tongue: puffy, sticky or greasy coat

              Pulse: slippery, weak

                Clinical Categorization

                Cautions

                  Contraindicated during pregnancy

                    Chu Kou Wei Wan (Chu Kou Wei Wan)

                    Clinical Usages

                    • Acid reflux and/or burning sensation in the epigastrium, throat, or mouth from stomach fire.
                    • Ulcers, sores, or other types of abcess in the mouth due to persistent stomach heat.
                    • Constant sense of hunger or noticable increse in appetite.
                    • Commonly used to treat bad breath (halitosis).

                      Clinical Categorization

                      Mu Xiang Shun Qi Wan (Saussurea Qi Promoting Pills)

                      Clinical Usages

                      • Bloating, lower abdominal pain, sluggish bowels.
                      • Acid reflux/heartburn, nausea with possible vomitting after meals.

                        Clinical Categorization

                        Cautions

                          • Use with caution for preganacy.

                            Sha Shen Mai Dong Wan (Glehnia and Ophiopogonis Decoction)

                            Clinical Usages

                            • Important formula for stomach yin deficiency - benefits the stomach and the lungs - a range of digestive issues (gastritis, epigastric pain), possibly with dry throat, thirst and/or cough.
                            • Diabetes - particularly with signs of dryness.
                            • A range of lung related issues - lung cancer, pneumonia, cough/wheezing.

                              Clinical Categorization

                              Shu Gan Wan (Liver Comfort Pills)

                              Clinical Usages

                              • Abdominal and/or Hypochondriac pain, cramps or spasms resulting from liver qi stagnation.
                              • Alternating chills and fever.
                              • Nausea, bloating, acid reflux, alternating stools, or IBS like symptoms caused by the liver invading the spleen.

                                Clinical Categorization

                                Cautions

                                  • Use with caution with pregnancy.

                                    Xiang Lian Wan (Aucklandia and Coptis Pills)

                                    Clinical Usages

                                    • Diarrhea expecially with bright blood or mucus and foul smelling resuling from damp heat.
                                    • Nausea, abdominal cramps or bloating, with possible loss of appetite from damp accumulation.
                                    • Vomitting, hiccups, excessive belching, acid reflux due to rebellious stomach qi and heat.
                                    • The modifications in Jia Wei Xiang Lian Wan add more movement and stronger heat clearing from the base.

                                      Clinical Categorization

                                      Cautions

                                      • Use with caution during pregnancy.

                                        Xiang Sha Yang Wei Wan (Aucklandia Amomi Nurture Stomach Pills)

                                        Clinical Usages

                                        • Low appetite, apathy towards eating due to spleen qi deficiency.
                                        • Acid reflux, indigestion, epigastric pain, tendency to feel full even with small quantities of food.
                                        • Food stagnation due to overeating.

                                          Clinical Categorization

                                          Cautions

                                            •  

                                              Yi Guan Jian Wan (Linking Decoction)

                                              Clinical Usages

                                              • GI issues from yin deficiency (liver and kidney) with liver qi stagnation leading to stomach yin issues - gastritis, ulcers, reflux, bloating.
                                              • The underlying factors lead to dryness of the blood, that coupled with liver qi stagnation and yin deficiency may lead to PMS, inosmnia, etc.
                                              • With the right underlying factors useful for a range of liver conditions - hepatitis, fatty liver.
                                              • Essential hypertension, preeclampsia.

                                                Clinical Categorization

                                                Yue Ju Wan (Escape Restraint Pill)

                                                Clinical Usages

                                                • An important formula for plum pit qi and related issues arising from qi stagnation (from many factors) - an oppressive sensation in the chest and/or diaphgram, gerd, reflux, indigestion, nausea, belching with a fetid odor.
                                                • Gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, intercostal neuralgia, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis.
                                                • Infectious hepatitis.
                                                • Migraines when the underlying factor is that of stagnation.
                                                • Besides a range of digestive issues, the formula may be used for a wide range of psychiatric conditions including depression, schizophrenia, panic disorder, etc. when the underlying factor is chiefly stagnation.

                                                  Clinical Categorization

                                                  Cautions

                                                    • Generally should be avoided in cases where the issues are arising from predominately deficiency syndromes (weakness, loose stools, no appetite).

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