Herbs That Regulate The Qi - Functional Grouping Relationships

Herbs That Regulate The Qi - General Concepts

  • Used with Qi disorders involving deficiency and stagnation.
  • These herbs are primarily used for stagnation involving the spleen and stomach, constrained liver qi, and stagnant lung qi.

Herbs That Regulate The Qi - Section Summary

  • Choose the appropriate herbs based on type of obstruction, nature, location:
  • Chen Pi vs. Qing Pi
    • Chen Pi - more harmonious, enters qi level of the spleen and lung, vertical (coughing/vomiting).
    • Qing Pi - scatters and unblocks, harsh, used to break up qi stagnation, horizontal (pain).
  • Mu Xiang vs. Xiang Fu - both for abdominal pain.
    • Mu Xiang - promotes movement of clumped qi in stomach and intestines - distention and fullness of epigastrium and abdomen along with diarrhea.
    • Xiang Fu - disperses/spreads stagnant qi in the liver and stomach, best used for problems secondary to emotional constraint, epigastric and hypochondriac distention and pain, menstrual problems.
  • Wu Yao - warmer and more restricted to cold problems - for pain anywhere in the truck from the genitals to the chest.
  • Selection Based on Accompanying Symptoms:

The Herbs That Regulate The Qi Grouping Has 16 Herbs In Our Database

Chen Pi

  • Tangerine Peel
    • Regulates Qi, improves transportive function of the spleen, relieves diaphragm - epigastric/abdominal distention, fullness, bloating, belching, nausea, vomiting (promotes movement of qi in general; specifically directing it downward - good for different types of nausea/vomiting).
    • Important herb for drying dampness and the transformation of phlegm - coughs with stifling sensation in the chest/diaphragm, and copious viscous sputum (qi-level herb).
    • Prevents stagnation - prevents cloying of tonifying herbs.
    • Ju Hong is the red part of the tangerine peel - it is more drying and aromatic.

Chen Xiang

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  • Aloeswood
    • Promotes the movement of Qi, alleviates pain - distention and pain in abdominal region due to cold from deficiency or blood stasis.
    • Directs rebellious Qi downward - excess/deficiency wheezing, vomiting, belching, hiccups due to cold from deficiency of the middle jiao.
    • Helps the kidneys grasp Qi - asthma and wheezing.

Chuan Lian Zi

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  • Sichuan Pagoda Tree Fruit
    • Promotes the movement of Qi and stops pain - flank, rib, abdominal pain due to liver qi stagnation or liver-stomach disharmony; hernial disorders, good w/heat signs.
    • Clears heat, dries dampness, regulates qi, alleviates pain due to damp-heat stagnant qi - same symptoms as above.
    • Kills parasites and stops pain - roundworms and tape worms (primarily for pain).
    • Compare with Xia Ku Cao, Long Dan Cao, Zhi Zi for clearing liver heat function.

Da Fu Pi

  • Areca Peel, Betel Husk
    • Promotes the downward movement of Qi, reduces stagnation - food stagnation and qi obstruction w/epigastric and abdominal distention, belching, acid regurgitation, constipation.
    • Expels damp, promotes urination - edema, dampness in the stomach and intestines.

Fo Shou

  • Finger Citron Fruit
    • Regulates and soothes liver Qi - rib pain and distention, belching.
    • Harmonizes the stomach and strengthens the spleen - epigastric pain and distention, lack of appetite, belching, vomiting.
    • Dries dampness and transforms phlegm - chronic cough with phlegm and chest pain (weak, not well suited for acute conditions).

Li Zhi He

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  • Leechee Nut
    • Regulates the Qi and stops pain - abdominal and epigastric pain due to liver qi stagnation, PMS pain, post-partum pain due to qi and blood stagnation.
    • Disperses cold and stagnation - hernia and testicular pain due to cold in the liver channel.

Mei Gui Hua

  • Young Flower of Chinese Rose
    • Promotes the movement of Qi and relieves constraint - liver-stomach disharmony with pain and distention in the flanks and epigastrium, belching, poor appetite.
    • Promotes the movement of Qi, harmonizes the Blood, disperses stasis - irregular menses, breast tenderness (PMS), menstrual pain; stasis from trauma.

Mu Xiang

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  • Costus Root
    • Promotes the movement of Qi, alleviates pain - stagnant qi of the stomach and/or spleen causing lack of appetite, abdominal pain, distention, nausea; liver or gallbladder qi stagnation causing flank pain, distention.
    • Regulates stagnated Qi in the intestines - diarrhea, abdominal pain (common herb to treat tenesmus).
    • Strengthens the spleen and prevents stagnation, used with tonifying herbs to reduce side effects.

Qing Pi

  • Green Tangerine Peel
    • Spreads liver Qi and breaks up stagnation - liver Qi stagnation symptoms such as distention and pain in the chest, breast, and/or hypochondriac regions; hernial pain.
    • Reduces food stagnation - pain in the epigastrium.
    • Dries dampness and transforms phlegm - malarial disorders w/phlegm, dampness, and breast abscesses.
    • Raises blood pressure.

Shi Di

Tan Xiang

  • Sandalwood
    • Promotes Qi movement, alleviates pain - chest and abdomen pain.

Wu Yao

  • Lindera Root
    • Promotes the movement of Qi, alleviates pain by warming and dispersing - flank, chest, epigastric, abdominal pain, hernia, menstrual pains due to cold constraint and qi stagnation.
    • Warms the kidneys - frequent urination or incontinence due to kidney yang deficiency and cold from deficiency of the bladder.

Xiang Fu

  • Nut Grass Rhizome
    • Spreads and regulates the Qi, soothes the liver - hypochondriac pain, epigastric distention, disharmony between the liver and the spleen.
    • Regulates menses, alleviates pain (by resolving liver qi stagnation) - dysmenorrhea, irregular menses.

Xie Bai

  • Chive Bulb
    • Unblocks the yang Qi and disperses cold phlegm - damp-cold bi of the chest due to cold turbid phlegm preventing the flow of yang qi - chest, flank, or upper back pain, dyspnea, coughing, wheezing, stifling sensation in the chest.
    • Promotes the movement of Qi and Blood, alleviates pain - epigastric fullness, distention, abdominal pain, chest pain due to blood obstructing the heart channel.
    • Directs Qi downward, reduces stagnation - damp stagnation in the large intestine (dysenteric disorders).

Zhi Ke

Zhi Shi

  • Immature Bitter Orange
    • Breaks up Qi stagnation, reduces accumulations, transforms phlegm - epigastric or abdominal pain and distention or indigestion w/focal distention or gas.
    • Directs qi downward and unblocks bowels - frequently used for abdominal pain and constipation by accumulation and stagnant Qi.
    • Transforms phlegm and expels focal.
    • Used with Qi tonifying herbs for the prolapse of organs.
    • Raises blood pressure.
  • Cautions
    • Avoid during Pregnancy.

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